Center News

  • Dukes elected Fellow American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
  • Researchers Answer How "Green" Are Urban Trees?
  • Chris Marble awarded UF/IFAS equipment grant
  • Michael Dukes elected Fellow Environmental and Water Resources Institute
  • Dukes paper on residential irrigation demand wins award
  • UF helps residents save at least 65 million gallons in outdoor irrigation annually
  • Center's Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ program major part of new landmark water study
  • Gail Hansen and Esen Momol lead design for new garden at Florida hospital
  • Adam Dale and Basil Iannone awarded seed funding
  • Hayk Khachatryan part of $7 million grant from USDA
  • Hayk Khachatryan paper wins at international conference

Michael Dukes elected Fellow American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

CLCE Director Dr. Michael Dukes was elected to the grade of Fellow by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) in 2017. An ASABE Fellow is defined as a member with at least 20 years membership and that has unusual professional qualities with outstanding and extraordinary qualifications and experience in, or related to the field of agricultural, food, or biological systems engineering. It is ASABE's highest honor. Dukes will be officially named during ASABE’s annual meeting on July 17 in Spokane, Washington. Read the full IFAS news story, "Renowned UF professor named a Fellow by national organization."


Researchers Answer How "Green" Are Urban Trees?

A group of researchers from the University of Illinois, University of Florida, and University of Kentucky, take a look at urban tree carbon sequestration and tree maintenance practices. Researchers led by Dr. Dewayne Ingram, University of Kentucky, set out to determine at what point urban trees sequester as much carbon as is emitted during maintenance practices over their lifespan. Another way to phrase this is: at what point do urban trees become carbon neutral?

"Our research shows the importance of selecting good quality trees that are suited for the planting site and doing what we can to enhance their longevity,” Dr. Andrew Koeser, University of Florida, says. “Failed plantings and premature tree death can end up causing environmental disservice."

Read the full article online at Alliance for Community Trees, an Arbor Day Foundation program.


Chris Marble awarded UF/IFAS equipment grant

CLCE faculty member Dr. S. Chris Marble was awarded a grant through the UF/IFAS Equipment and Infrastructure Awards Program. The funds will go to the purchase a LI-COR 6800, which measures photosynthesis. This is Li-COR's newest model. Many of the faculty at the Mid-Florida Research and Education Center will be using the equipment. They will use it to closely monitor how plants are responding to stress (water, heat, drought, disease, etc.), herbicide applications, nutrition, growing conditions, and other impacts. The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources, in partnership with the University of Florida's Office of the Vice President for Research, offer the Equipment and Infrastructure Awards Program with the goal of enhancing infrastructural capacity for research within UF/IFAS, to increase the impacts of our research efforts, and to increase our competitiveness for extramural funding. There were 62 proposals submitted, more than double from the previous year.


Michael Dukes elected Fellow Environmental and Water Resources Institute

CLCE Director Dr. Michael Dukes was elected to the grade of Fellow by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Environmental and Water Resources Institute (EWRI) in 2017. An EWRI Fellow is defined as a member with at least 10 years of membership and has demonstrated accomplishments that have contributed significantly to the advancement or application of water resources or environmental engineering, science, and technology.


Michael Dukes paper on residential irrigation demand wins award

CLCE Director Dr. Michael Dukes' paper, "Mining for Water: Using Billing Data to Characterize Residential Irrigation Demand" was recognized by the American Water Works Association Water Conservation Division as Best Paper. His graduate student, Mackenzie Boyer was primary author and coauthors include Dr. Linda Young and Shu Wang. The award will be given at the June 2017 AWWA annual conference in Philadelphia.


UF helps residents save at least 65 million gallons in outdoor irrigation annually

Participants in a UF/IFAS program saved 65 million gallons in outdoor irrigation in 2016, enough to supply 15 subdivisions with water for a year, experts with the Center for Landscape Conservation and Ecology say. "UF/IFAS is making a difference with our limited water resources," said Laura Warner, assistant professor of agricultural education and communication. "Seemingly small drops in the bucket really add up when we look at the big picture across the state and over time." Using less water also saves money: $200,000 a year in tap water utility bills, said CLCE affiliate faculty member Tatiana Borisova, a co-investigator and associate professor of food and resource economics. Their figures come from a sample of Extension agents in 16 Florida counties, so the savings may be greater, the researchers said. Read the full article at UF/IFAS News.


Center's Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ program major part of landmark water study

"Water 2070: Mapping Florida's Future - Alternative Patterns of Water Use in 2070" is a report from a joint effort among Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DACS), University of Florida Geoplan Center, and 1000 Friends of Florida. The project's goal was to "explore the impact on water demand of projected population growth and agriculture demand" in the coming years. The report concludes that there are two fundamental options to address future water demand: increase supply or reduce demand. Focusing on the second option, the report recommends using two existing statewide programs, Florida Water Star and the Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL), a program of the Center for Landscape Conservation and Ecology. Recommended actions included expanding funding and requiring FFL standards for all new development. The summary report (pdf) is available online at the 1000 Friends of Florida's Water 2070 website.


Gail Hansen and Esen Momol lead design for new garden at Florida hospital

CLCE faculty Dr. Gail Hansen and Dr. Esen Momol recently led a University of Florida design team to create Florida Hospital Fish Memorial's community garden. "We are so thankful for our partnerships with the University of Florida. They so willingly shared their knowledge and expertise, designing this entire space," said Maureen Mercho, Florida Hospital Fish Memorial Foundation executive director. "This is huge for West Volusia and something to celebrate. On this single plot of land, members of our community can grow their own organic food and get exercise while doing it. What could be better?" Read the full article on the Florida Hospital website.


Adam Dale and Basil Iannone awarded seed funding

The IFAS Early Career Scientist Seed Funding program has recognized two CLCE affiliate faculty. Dr. Adam Dale, an assistant professor in turfgrass and ornamental entomology, was awarded $50,000 in research funding for his project, "The effects of turfgrass diversity on arthropod pests and biological control in urban landscapes." Dr. Basil Iannone, an assistant professor with the School of Forest Resources and Conservation was also awarded $50,000 for his proposal "Evaluating the contribution of biotic complexity to pest control in ornamental plant communities." The IFAS Dean for Research office, in partnership with the Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Vice President for Research, has once again implemented the funding program to facilitate development of new faculty research, jumpstart their research programs, and to provide a platform for their future success. Out of 25 proposals, 15 were awarded. The scientists will present their preliminary research results at the 2017 IFAS Research Awards Ceremony.


Hayk Khachatryan part of $7 million grant from USDA

CLCE faculty member Hayk Khachatryan, assistant professor and extension economist, is part of two projects recently announced as funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). On Tuesday August 2, 2016, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced this year's Specialty Crop Research and Extension Investments (SCRI) funded projects. The first award is a 5-year project with approximately $7 million in funding; Dr. Khachatryan is one of the Co-PIs. Funding for the project, titled "Protecting Pollinators with Economically Feasible and Environmentally Sound Ornamental Horticulture," will support 21 scientists and extension experts at 12 different institutions. The lead facilitator of the project is the IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program at Rutgers University. Dr. Khachatryan is also part of the grant awarded to IR-4 for $50,000 for "Identifying Knowledge Gaps and Novel Management Strategies for Downy Mildews Impacting Environmental Horticulture Crops". Read the full press release from Rutgers.


Return to Top